Resident attitude towards conservation and black howler monkeys in Belize: the Community Baboon Sanctuary

  • Resident attitude towards conservation and black howler monkeys in Belize: the Community Baboon Sanctuary

by Sara Alexander

 

Summary

The Community Baboon Sanctuary is held by the Belizean government to be a model for participatory ecotourism development. Membership in the Sanctuary is voluntary and involves a commitment to protect riverine resources as habitat for black howler monkeys (Alouatta nigra). While most local residents understand the intrinsic, aesthetic and material values of this important resource and recognize that protection of it can provide opportunities for promoting ecotourism activities in their communities, some members are dissatisfied with the project and threaten to withdraw their membership. This study aimed to define residents feelings about resource protection in their communities and their attitudes towards management of the Sanctuary.

 

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Keywords: ecotourism, howler monkey, wildlife conservation, community

 

Suggested APA reference: Alexander, S. (2000). Resident attitude towards conservation and black howler monkeys in Belize: the Community Baboon Sanctuary . Environment Conservation 27(4): 342- 350.

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